Where’d You Go, Bernadette by Maria Semple

Where'd You Go, BernadetteWhere’d You Go, Bernadette by Maria Semple
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This is awkward and quirky, in the best sort of way. I confess, I was along on the ride more for the amusing character interactions and relationships, rather than for the mystery, but the mystery was interesting, overall.

This was very different than what I expected, which tends to be a good thing.

Pages: 330

View all my reviews

Share Content:
Share

The Life We Bury by Allen Eskens

The Life We Bury (Joe Talbert, #1; Max Rupert, #1)The Life We Bury by Allen Eskens
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Overall, I found this fascinating, and it went in all sorts of unexpected directions. I was able to predict a lot of the outcomes ahead of time, but there was one thing that caught me off guard and surprised me.

There are some things that happen at the end that are a bit ridiculous, though they definitely make the story more dramatic and intense. I just occasionally wanted to shake a few characters for making such poor choices in such a serious situation, but such is humanity.

Overall, this is a captivating read, and I’m glad I picked it up on Audible, as the audiobook narration is excellent.

Pages: 303

View all my reviews

Share Content:
Share

The Princess and the Fangirl by Ashley Poston

The Princess and the FangirlThe Princess and the Fangirl by Ashley Poston
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I loved this one, but I’m a sucker for a Parent Trap situation, even if I occasionally have to suspend disbelief to stay in the moment.

I have to confess, I wasn’t even aware this is the 2nd book, following Geekerella. I just saw it on NetGalley, and requested an ARC because it looked interesting. I confess that I liked this one better than Geekerella, and it breaks out a whole lot of literary tropes, including a Romeo and Juliet scene that actually manages to be charming.

The story has two unique POVs, one that is a bit angsty and always hard on herself, and one that is awkward but open in an honest, refreshing, and often funny sort of way. It’s a really nice contrast, and I even enjoyed the different budding relationships and feelings that evolve (not between the two POVs).

I liked this a lot, and while it references Geekerella, you don’t necessarily need to read the first book to understand and enjoy this. I say that with certainty, because I probably read 500 books between Geekerella and this one, which means I don’t remember much of Geekerella anymore, but I survived this new addition just fine.

This one is great for nerds, fangirls, fanboys, and pop culture junkies, as well as anyone who likes interesting and diverse contemporary romance novels. Added bonus: the Con setting.

Pages: 320

View all my reviews

Share Content:
Share

An American Marriage by Tayari Jones

An American MarriageAn American Marriage by Tayari Jones
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

So I picked this up in an Audible sale, saw that it had a billion reviews, and decided to give it a try without even knowing what it was about.

It turns out the title, cover, and story don’t feel in any way related to me, so I was in for a lot of interesting surprises with this story. I liked it far better than I expected, based on the title and cover, because this dealt with the impacts of a false conviction. Even though it is called An American Marriage, it’s more about the family you’re dealt, the family you find, and the family that you make, and how often those are not the same.

There was some extra drama at the end that didn’t always seem helpful or to make much sense to me, but I really enjoyed the story overall. It’s not really a feel good kind of story, but it definitely gives you things to think about.

I’m really glad I bought this and read it, and I think if you find the cover or title off-putting, just ignore them, as they don’t really match what I feel are the truths of this story.

Page: 308

View all my reviews

Share Content:
Share