About baw29640

Wri•ter \ˈrī-tər\: Neurotic librarian, lives in dream world, mutters to self, addicted to caffeine, edits compulsively, kills people for entertainment.

Review: Teenage Diaries: Then and Now

Teenage Diaries: Then and Now
Teenage Diaries: Then and Now by Radio Diaries
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This is more of a podcast than a book, but it’s definitely worth a listen. I received it free from SYNC, which is why I gave it a try, and I’m glad that I did. These real stories are interesting, charming, upsetting, and inspiring. There is a good variety of different lifestyles represented, which makes the perspectives quite interesting, especially when paired together.

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Review: The One Safe Place

The One Safe Place
The One Safe Place by Tania Unsworth
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

This is not for me. It’s middle grade, but it’s definitely lower middle grade. I thought that the ages of the characters (which I never really figured out or somehow missed), were upper middle grade, but the voices of the characters were incredibly young, more like 8 or 9 years old, which is fine but not what I was expecting based on the description and cover. Also, the characters actions and voices often seemed at odds for me, which I struggled with throughout. It’s like the two never meshed in a way that felt honest.

The writing is what really killed it for me with this one. It just needed a lot more editing and better character development. There’s a major disconnect, like the characters are caricatures, or ideas, instead of real people. I just didn’t care about any of them.

As for the rest of the writing, there’s a line that stuck with me from the first part of the story that basically sums up my dissatisfaction with the writing throughout the story. The whole book just sounds rough around the edges, like it lacked good editors. It’s full of telling, instead of showing. The line said something about drinking water, and it read similar to, “it tasted orange and brown and gritty.”…even though you can’t taste orange. You see it. And if you tell me something tastes orange, I immediately think Koolaid or orange soda.

Also, you can’t taste gritty. You feel it. I know that sounds nit-picky, but when I’m trying to understand a scene or moment, the word choices and senses impacted matter. Good choices have a strong impact and pull people into the story. Weak or bad choices are off-putting and lead to a disconnect for the reader. Basically, this story lacks imagery and description , and while I’m not a huge fan of excessive description, there has to be some level of successful scene setting in a story like this that’s not all telling, as I want to see what’s happening, not just read lists about things.

That basically sums up the writing throughout the book. It’s just not as effective as it could/should be, because sentences and phrases are tossed around without any careful consideration for what is actually occurring. A good editor should have pushed for clarity and pointed out more of the issues, in this story, like the poor use of clues, the too obvious setups and story line, and all the telling instead of showing.

I guess what it boils down to is that I just can’t connect to this book, and typically I love this genre.

Maybe it’s just me.

Pages: 304

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Review: Leave Me

Leave Me
Leave Me by Gayle Forman
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Initially, I did not love this story, but it grew on me by the end, enough that I felt slightly more satisfied that I hadn’t completely wasted my time.

My major complaint, beyond the initial disconnect, is that the story doesn’t end far from where it started. None of the major issues are resolved, or even addressed. None of the mysteries are answered. Threads start and then just drop. Kerplop. Never to be picked back up.

While some of the characters are interesting, the majority of them don’t change or grow.

(view spoiler)

Pages: 343 (hide spoiler)]

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