The Kill Club by Wendy Heard

The Kill ClubThe Kill Club by Wendy Heard
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I should start this off by saying about 32.7% of me wants to actually be in the kill club, 56.3% of me is absolutely horrified by it, and 11% of me seriously wonders if someone is going to go out and try to start their own kill club after reading this. I mean, it’s practically a user’s guide for how to kill and/or fail to kill bad humans, which makes it a total breeding ground for future serial killers to converge around. Good lord, I hope that doesn’t happen, but this book does provide some sort of deranged education that could be useful to the wrong crowd.

If you’re the wrong crowd, then move along, there is nothing to see here. Also, I am not available for killing, as my calendar is quite full.

Anyway, let’s get back to the point, which is that this book is thrilling right up until the very last page. It’s dark, intense, and seriously emotional (or maybe that was just me, as I think I emotionally flailed through the whole book). Maybe we should just ignore the fact that I dropped the book quickly around page 311 and glared at it intensely for 2 days, while chewing all my fingernails to stubs, before I was able to pick it back up again and finish reading.

I am convinced that I need to be best friends with Jazz, the main character, even though she’s not really the warm, snuggly bestie type of person. In fact, I think she’d probably hate me if we met in real life. Sigh. I have to up my street cred. My Midwestern upbringing seems to be harmful to forming real and lasting literary friendships with fictional characters.

Back to the point, I effing love this book. I mean, this is how you follow up a stellar debut—with a second offering that left me guessing and stressing the whole way through. There were so many twists and turns that I just never saw coming. My adrenaline level has been so high that I haven’t slept well since I picked this book up (3 days ago). And now, it ended, and I’m still intensely anxious (thanks a lot, Wendy Heard).

It’s well-written, brilliantly plotted, and the character development is top notch. I enjoyed so many of the characters, as even the really awful people are absolutely fascinating. This book puts the characters in situations where they have to make a lot of hard decisions, and I think that’s part of why this is so phenomenal. Nobody gets an easy ride, and not knowing what will happen next or how someone will react to a situation is half the charm of the story (assuming I can call it charm, considering the story is full of brutal murder scenarios—I’m not sure what the appropriate review etiquette is for this sort of situation).

I suspect an audiobook version of this would be phenomenal (and/or emotionally debilitating), which means I have to go now, as I want to hop on over to Audible and see if I can preorder a copy.

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Storm and Fury by Jennifer L. Armentrout

Storm and Fury (The Harbinger, #1)Storm and Fury by Jennifer L. Armentrout
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

What a fascinating world and concept! I was so caught up in this story and addicted to these characters. Jennifer L. Armentrout can do no wrong, as far as I’m concerned.

This is an unusual take on angels and demons that focuses far more on Wardens, which are gargoyles come to life. And oh, my goodness, do I need a gargoyle, stat. Holy mother of all things sexy and brutal.

This book will definitely cross appeal to both the YA crowd and the NA crowd. I think it is a must purchase for all collections serving those audiences, and while there is a solid wrap up and conclusion to book one, I still can’t wait to get my hands on book two.

This is highly recommended for anyone who enjoys a bit of forbidden romance tucked in between vicious demon attacks. There’s also some good humor with this story, and Trinity, the MC, is very strong, determined, and impulsive. She gets herself into scrape after scrape, because she doesn’t allow a group of men to dictate what she should do or who she should be. I really enjoyed her.

I meant to post this review yesterday, when the book was released, but I was delayed by unexpected house guests (oops!). Thank you to NetGalley and the Publisher for allowing me to read an advanced copy of this book.

Pages: 512

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Succubus Blues by Richelle Mead

Succubus Blues (Georgina Kincaid, #1)Succubus Blues by Richelle Mead
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I love Mead’s YA series, so I’m not sure what took me so long to pick up this novel, as I really enjoyed it. It’s an urban fantasy that is more of a paranormal mystery than a romance, not that it doesn’t have a few romantic moments, but the storyline and plot always come first.

The characters are interesting and well-developed, as with all of Mead’s books, and I read this straight through and immediately picked up book 2.

Pages: 343

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The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater

The Raven Boys (The Raven Cycle, #1)The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

#BecRereads2019

It was such a pleasure to revisit these old friends and make them new again. Also, my perspective on some aspects of this story seems to shift a bit as I age, so I love how that makes the story just a bit different every time I revisit it.

The Raven Boys continue to charm me, even though the majority of them could never be called charming. Will Patton’s narration for the audiobook is beyond stellar, and I can’t read these in print anymore. I have to listen to the Audible version, because Patton has become such an inherent element to the atmosphere of this story that I cannot accept it any other way at this point. It’s audio perfection.

Page: 409

PREVIOUS REVIEW:
Wow! I had no idea what this novel was about when I started, and it shocked me in a very good way. The concept is fascinating and unexpected. The characters are unique and surprising. Some of the plot twists blew my mind. It definitely took me to new and interesting places.

I listened to this on audiobook, and the reader is outstanding. I’m picky about being read out loud to, but I really enjoyed this audio. In fact, I think the excellent reading totally added to the overall experience. My favorite part of the story was the richness of the characters though. They were so captivating and strangely charming, even when they weren’t necessarily being pleasant.

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The Boxcar Children by Gertrude Chandler Warner

The Boxcar Children (The Boxcar Children, #1)The Boxcar Children by Gertrude Chandler Warner
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I was obsessed with The Boxcar Children as a child. I mean what’s not to love about a smart group of orphans who learn to survive on their own and do their best to stick together and protect each other? There are 4 of them, and I have 3 siblings, so I was sure that should the need ever arise, I would be ready to live with my siblings in a boxcar. In fact, I wanted to (not that I wanted anything bad to happen to my mom, but boxcar in the wilderness would have made a kickass club house).

Also, the children adopt an inured dog, even though feeding it means less food for themselves. I mean, come on! Could these children be any more amazing?

As an adult, I was curious to reread this to see if it still held the charm and whimsy of my childhood. I confess, I enjoyed reliving this book, but a bit of my realistic adult has snuck in at this point and therefore questions some of the things I never questioned as a child. Go figure. Growing up does seem to ruin a lot of good things, but it comes with some amazing perks, like being able to drink coffee without being told it will stunt your growth (clearly that was a lie, as I’m 5’10”).

Anyway, long story short, this is a charming and fun read for elementary students. While I confess that I could have survived in the wilderness (and practically did) as a child, I don’t think my nieces and nephews would far this well, which makes it even more interesting to me and probably also to them.

Pages: 160

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I’m Fine and Neither Are You by Camille Pagán

I'm Fine and Neither Are YouI’m Fine and Neither Are You by Camille Pagán
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I was surprised by how much I liked this one, and it was more of a stressful read than expected. I listen to the audio, which I thought was good and expressive.

All I wanted was just a bit more of the really sweet moments, surrounding all the hard times and tragedy, but this tackled a lot of issues that women, families, and marriages deal with. It felt authentic, and it was well-written.

Pages: 270

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The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger

The Time Traveler's WifeThe Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Such a clever masterpiece. I am in awe of how well this nonlinear format was juggled, so that everything worked out and progressed in a way that was both fascinating and satisfying.

Now, I’m going to go watch the movie, which I might regret, but I can’t help myself.

Pages: 500

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